Music of the Sixties Forever: Joan Baez

Music of the Sixties Forever: Joan Baez

Music of the Sixties Forever: John Lennon withhis Rolls Royce. Kenwood, June 29,...

Music of the Sixties Forever: John Lennon withhis Rolls Royce. Kenwood, June 29,...

Music of the Sixties Forever: Keith Moon

Music of the Sixties Forever: Keith Moon

Music of the Sixties Forever: Keith Moon

Music of the Sixties Forever: Keith Moon

Music of the Sixties Forever: Tammi Terrell

Music of the Sixties Forever: Tammi Terrell

Music of the Sixties Forever: Tammi Terrell

Music of the Sixties Forever: Tammi Terrell

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Pretty Kittens' posing for a promotional photo...

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Pretty Kittens' posing for a promotional photo...

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Troggs

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Troggs

Music of the Sixties Forever: Jim Morrison masterbates on stage, gets arrested

Music of the Sixties Forever: Jim Morrison masterbates on stage, gets arrested

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Doors, Steppenwolf and the Chambers brothers, ...

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Doors, Steppenwolf and the Chambers brothers, ...

Music of the Sixties Forever: Dinah Ross

Music of the Sixties Forever: Dinah Ross

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Zombies, greatest group ever

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Zombies, greatest group ever

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Monkees!

Music of the Sixties Forever: The Monkees!

Music of the Sixties Forever: Abbey Road

Music of the Sixties Forever: Abbey Road

All the way with RFK


God, How I hated the 70's: Led Zeppelin, Milan, July 5, 1971

God, How I hated the 70's: Led Zeppelin, Milan, July 5, 1971

God, How I hated the 70's: So 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: So 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: Leon Russel 1971

God, How I hated the 70's: Leon Russel 1971

God, How I hated the 70's: Rush...check out the shoes

God, How I hated the 70's: Rush...check out the shoes

God, How I hated the 70's: Dolly, a bright spot in the dreary 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: Dolly, a bright spot in the dreary 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: Cher, another bright spot of the 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: Cher, another bright spot of the 70s

God, How I hated the 70's: Taxi Driver....for me this film sums up all that w...

God, How I hated the 70's: Taxi Driver....for me this film sums up all that w...

God, How I hated the 70's: Marsha Marsha Marsha!

God, How I hated the 70's: Marsha Marsha Marsha!

God, How I hated the 70's: John and Yoko

God, How I hated the 70's: John and Yoko

Hippy Cult


Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Timothy Leary. Everybody gets the Timothy Leary they Deserve:

Year One, 1955: At the Palm Springs parade in February 1955. I fou...

Year One, 1955: At the Palm Springs parade in February 1955. I fou...

Year One, 1955: Diana Dors, 1955, very big in 1955

Year One, 1955: Diana Dors, 1955, very big in 1955

Year One, 1955: James Dean photographed by Sanford Roth, 1955.

Year One, 1955: James Dean photographed by Sanford Roth, 1955.

Year One, 1955: James Dean photographed by Sanford Roth, 1955.

Year One, 1955: James Dean photographed by Sanford Roth, 1955.

Year One, 1955: The pin up is still popular

Year One, 1955: The pin up is still popular

Year One, 1955: Men at work

Year One, 1955: Men at work

Year One, 1955: Men at work

Year One, 1955: Men at work

Year One, 1955: The new American majority, teenagers

Year One, 1955: The new American majority, teenagers

Wow, I never realized how beautiful Elizabeth Montgomery was.


She died of cancer in May of 1995, eight weeks after being diagnosed with the disease

I had one of these!....terrible car, you could feel every bump


Mia Farrow

That was a very radical haircut for women in the 1960s, we didn't know what to make of her.

In the 1960s comic books were $15 to 25 cents


The Newman's.

In the early 1970s I was driving with some friends out in Litchfield County and Paul Newman zoomed out of a junk yard drive way in a Volkswagon and cut us off.  I don't know why Paul Newman was in a junkyard or a Volkswagon. We chased him for a few miles just for the hell of it but he lost us. 

That Girl!

This really wasn't a show  boys my age watched, she was ....a....I think she worked at the UN...and the guy was always exasperated or in a bad mood over something as far as I can remember....the actor was Ted Bissel, he died in 1996. The show had a cool opening theme....


Here. here's some Beatles stuff for you








The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Katherine Carpenter, Robert Vaughn, David McCallum, New York City, 1965 by Jerry Schatzberg.

                               I LOVED this show, I can't figure out why they took it off the air.

On the beach at Coney Island

Coney Island is where my mother, a Brooklynite, would go in the summer when she was a girl, and in the 1960s we went down there a few times when we were visiting her family, although by them it wasn't much really, after that we starting going to the Beaches in RI

Elizabeth Taylor...thank you Elizabeth. I admire your, your um...what the hell was I going to...oh! acting, I admire your acting


Star Trek

Caltech students protest the rumored cancellation of the “Star Trek” TV series outside NBC Studios in Burbank, California, January 6, 1968 (My birthday, I was 13)

Anthony Perkins on the set of “Psycho”

                         To this day, I've never seen this film, I don't know why.


Psycho opened in New York City at the DeMille Theater (and the Baronet) on Thursday June 16th 1960

Elvis in Viva Las Vegas and Blue Hawaii


 I saw both of these films at the now defunct Capitol Theater on Main Street in Ansonia, Ct. where I grew up. I delivered newspapers for the Ansonia Evening Sentinel, sadly, also now defunct. Once a year the paper paid for all of the paper boys...that's what we were called and we were all boys, there were no paper girls that I ever say......to go to the movies and for some reason most of the films we were sent to watch were Elvis films. I liked both films but then again most of Elvis's films were pretty much the same.    

In 1960 he was still Senator Kennedy




Actor Richard Kiel has passed away at the age of 74.


Actor Richard Kiel has passed away at the age of 74. The larger than life (7' 2") Kiel used his stature convincingly in heavy roles like his portrayal of cable-chewing Bond villain Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me. He appeared on The Rifleman, Gilligan's Island, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Daniel Boone, Emergency!, and Land of the Lost. The actor published his autobiography in 2002, titled Making It Big In Movies

God Bless America



SEPTEMBER 11th...........this is a worth watching....God Bless America and God Bless my countrymen.

Music of the Sixties Forever: Liverpool pop legend Gerry Marsden has pulled out ...

Music of the Sixties Forever: Liverpool pop legend Gerry Marsden has pulled out ...: The Gerry and the Pacemakers star, 71, was due to travel across America as part of the British Invasion Tour, starting this month. Hi...

Sixties Fashion Returns: The Agelessness of Aquarius


As the Youthquake look swings back into play with fall's most influential (and timeless) collections, the question is: Did the '60s ever really go away?



ANTICIPATION HUNG THICK as 40-ply cashmere just before the Louis Vuitton fall fashion show in March. It was the debut collection from Nicolas Ghesquière, one of the industry's most innovative and influential designers, who had been absent from the runway for over a year since leaving his post at Balenciaga. The show space—serenely minimal and gray with metal-shuttered glass walls—betrayed few clues.
But as the shutters smoothly opened to let in the Parisian morning sunlight and the first look appeared, the tone was immediately set. You could almost hear an audible click in the fashion hive mind. Aha. The '60s.
The reference was clear. Wearing a wide-collared leather coat over a swingy cream minidress and black knee-high boots, model Freja Beha could have been French singer and style icon Françoise Hardy reborn. (Ms. Beha's Hardy-esque brown hair and bangs nicely completed the vision.) And though Mr. Ghesquière's well-received show was far from a straight-up retro redux—surely an A-line knit dress circa 1967 was never embellished with a swirl of feather-like paillettes—his nod in that direction was unmistakable.
A 1960s storm has been brewing of late in fashion. Early signs appeared in the nip-waisted minidresses and high-necked gowns that Valentino's been showing for the past few seasons. This fall, Gucci designer Frida Giannini recast the British dolly-bird look with an Italian eye for luxury and a refreshed millennial color palette. Think a double-breasted mint-green angora martingale coat over sky-blue leather pegged pants and matching python Chelsea boots. Meanwhile, Saint Laurent designer Hedi Slimane, ever a maestro of making retro relevant, mined Carnaby Street for his fall collection, resulting in leggy, rocker-chick dresses and cool school-girlish capes. The collection would have made an ideal wardrobe for Edie Sedgwick, Marianne Faithfull and Nico—and is now fit for modern-day counterparts like platinum-maned Slimane muse Sky Ferreira.




Two Ladies At The Automat 1966 by Diane Arbus






Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was a photographer and writer noted for black-and-white square photographs of "deviant and marginal people (dwarfs, giants, transgender people, nudists, circus performers) or of people whose normality seems ugly or surreal".

Arbus

 Arbus believed that a camera could be "a little bit cold, a little bit harsh" but its scrutiny revealed the truth; the difference between what people wanted others to see and what they really did see – the flaws.  A friend said that Arbus said that she was "afraid ... that she would be known simply as 'the photographer of freaks'", and that phrase has been used repeatedly to describe her.

Arbus was born Diane Nemerov to David Nemerov and Gertrude Russek Nemerov who owned Russek's, a famous Fifth Avenue department store. Because of her family's wealth, Arbus was insulated from the effects of the Great Depression while growing up in the 1930s.
 Arbus's father became a painter after retiring from Russek's; her younger sister would become a sculptor and designer; and her older brother, Howard Nemerov, would later become United States Poet Laureate, and the father of the Americanist art historian Alexander Nemerov.

Diane Nemerov attended the Fieldston School for Ethical Culture, a prep school. In 1941, at the age of eighteen, she married her childhood sweetheart Allan Arbus. Their first daughter Doon (who would later become a writer), was born in 1945 and their second daughter Amy (who would later become a photographer), was born in 1954.

The Arbuses' interests in photography led them, in 1941, to visit the gallery of Alfred Stieglitz, and learn about the photographers Mathew Brady, Timothy O'Sullivan, Paul Strand, Bill Brandt, and Eugène Atget. In the early 1940s, Diane's father employed them to take photographs for the department store's advertisements. Allan was a photographer for the U.S. Army Signal Corps in World War Two.

In 1946, after the war, the Arbuses began a commercial photography business called "Diane & Allan Arbus", with Diane as art director and Allan as the photographer.  They contributed to Glamour, Seventeen, Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, and other magazines even though "they both hated the fashion world".

In 1956, Arbus quit the commercial photography business. Although earlier she had studied photography with Berenice Abbott, her studies with Lisette Model, beginning in 1956, led to Arbus's most well-known methods and style.

She began photographing on assignment for magazines such as Esquire, Harper's Bazaar, and The Sunday Times Magazine in 1959.

Around 1962, Arbus switched from a 35 mm Nikon camera which produced grainy rectangular images to a twin-lens reflex Rolleiflex camera which produced more detailed square images.

In 1963, Arbus was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for a project on "American rites, manners, and customs"; the fellowship was renewed in 1966.  In 1964, Arbus began using a twin-lens reflex Mamiya camera with flash in addition to the Rolleiflex. Her methods included establishing a strong personal relationship with her subjects and re-photographing some of them over many years.

During the 1960s, she taught photography at the Parsons School of Design and the Cooper Union in New York City, and the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, Rhode Island.

The first major exhibition of her photographs occurred at the Museum of Modern Art in a 1967 show called "New Documents", curated by John Szarkowski. The show also featured the work of Garry Winogrand and Lee Friedlander.

 Some of her artistic work was done on assignment. Although she continued to photograph on assignment (e.g., in 1968 she shot documentary photographs of poor sharecroppers in rural South Carolina for Esquire magazine), in general her magazine assignments decreased as her fame as an artist increased. Szarkowski hired Arbus in 1970 to research an exhibition on photojournalism called "From the Picture Press"; it included many photographs by Weegee whose work Arbus admired.

Using softer light than in her previous photography, she took a series of photographs in her later years of people with intellectual disability showing a range of emotions. At first, Arbus considered these photographs to be "lyric and tender and pretty", but by June, 1971, she told Lisette Model that she hated them.

Diane and Allan Arbus separated in 1958, and were divorced in 1969.

Arbus experienced "depressive episodes" during her life similar to those experienced by her mother, and the episodes may have been made worse by symptoms of hepatitis.[6] Arbus wrote in 1968, "I go up and down a lot", and her ex-husband noted that she had "violent changes of mood".
On July 26, 1971, while living at Westbeth Artists Community in New York City, Arbus took her own life by ingesting barbiturates and slashing her wrists with a razor. Marvin Israel found her body in the bathtub two days later; she was 48 years old.

In 1972, a year after she killed herself, Arbus became the first American photographer to have photographs displayed at the Venice Biennale. Millions viewed traveling exhibitions of her work in 1972–1979.

 Between 2003 and 2006, Arbus and her work were the subjects of another major traveling exhibition, Diane Arbus Revelations.







HER SECRET SHAME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Isn't that Mrs. Peale?


A young Robert Redford


RFK




I was 13 years old when Senator Robert F. Kennedy was killed in June of 1968. I had a paper route, 50 houses in all, and the day after he was killed, June 9; there was a photo of the Senator on the front page of our local paper, the Ansonia Evening Sentential.
 It was a horrible photo.

He was lying on a floor; his arms spread out wide, a Filipino waiter holding up the senator head. I had to look at the photo fifty times that day and all these decades later, I can still see it. 

Senator Kennedy’s killer, Sirhan Sirhan said "My only connection with Robert Kennedy was his sole support of Israel and his deliberate attempt to send those 50 bombers to Israel to obviously do harm to the Palestinians”

M.T. Mehdi, then secretary-general of the Action Committee on American-Arab Relations, believed that Sirhan had acted in justifiable self-defense, stating: "Sirhan was defending himself against those 50 Phantom jets Kennedy was sending to Israel."

 (Sirhan shot five other people that night aside from Kennedy. Not one of them had sent a bomber to Israel)


The murder made Robert Kennedy one of the early victims of the Muslim extremist war on America that continues today. As for Sirhan, he has spent the last forty-six years in prison, almost always in solitary confinement for his own safety.  He has been denied parole repeatedly on the grounds that Sirhan still does not understand the full ramifications of his crime.

Literature is as old as speech


“Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it, and it has not changed except to become more needed.”  John Steinbeck (1962, December.) Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech. 

On Tuesday, November 9,1965 at about 5:15 PM, the lights went out




On Tuesday, November 9,1965 at about 5:15 PM, the lights went out from New Jersey,  through New York City and state, most of New England and up into the Ontario provinces of Canada.
It was the start of the Great Blackout of 1965.


In all, the blackout covered 80,000 miles and affected 30 million people. It lasted for 13 hours and was due to an improperly set relay. In other words, simple human error caused the great black out of 1965.
I was a ten-year-old living  in the  Naugatuck Valley when the blackout happened. Our father worked an overnight shift in New Haven in those days, so it was me, my younger brother and our mother at home.


My brother thought the blackout was the greatest thing since sliced bread, it was exciting. There was a full moon and the skies were clear and we lived high enough up on one of the hills to look down and across into the valley was in complete darkness.
We were baby boomers and had never known the fear of war or really, the want for anything. But my mother had lived thought the war and thought the blackout was ominous…maybe the Russian were behind it…maybe this was the start of the greatest war ever, nuclear annihilation. After all, it was the heart of the cold war. Te Cuban missile crisis had happened only two years before and the Berlin Wall had gone up just a year before that.    
Our radio worked and as always it was tuned into WELI in New Haven, the “Voice of the Valley.”  The station didn’t really know what was going on either  but they kept use clued in with news updates. When the station reported that the FBI was on the case my mother shook her head in approval “They’ll get to the bottom of this” she said.

The great black out came and went and although it was the talk of the valley for several days, eventually it was pushed aside by the Christmas holidays and thatw as that. Down in New York there were only five reports of looting in all of New York, then a city of 8 million souls. It was said to be the lowest amount of crime on any night in the city's history since records were first kept.


Music of the Sixties Forever: Terry Sylvester Of The Hollies Joins 'The British ...

Music of the Sixties Forever: Terry Sylvester Of The Hollies Joins 'The British ...:  Posted by Navi  Terry Sylvester, formerly of The Hollies, will stand-in for Gerry Marsden (of Gerry & The Pacemakers) in the Bri...

Darkness cannot drive out darkness;

 

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - Martin Luther King, Jr.”



Our lives begin


Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. - Martin Luther King
        

The stars up close

 
“The stars up close to the moon were pale; they got brighter and braver the farther they got out of the circle of light ruled by the giant moon.” Ken Kesey