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San Francisco


All the way with JFK


VW


Psycho


THE BEATLES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




Beer!



sixties chicks










Ward.........


Blackpool, England on a Sixties sunny day


Anne Francis as ‘Honey West’, 1965.


“Man on the Moon”, 1967, Norman Rockwell


Comet


God, How I hated the 70's: Ads

God, How I hated the 70's: Ads

God, How I hated the 70's: The 70s saw the last of the BIG cars

God, How I hated the 70's: The 70s saw the last of the BIG cars

God, How I hated the 70's: Jackie in the 1970s

God, How I hated the 70's: Jackie in the 1970s

God, How I hated the 70's: Patti D’Arbanville and Cat Stevens

God, How I hated the 70's: Patti D’Arbanville and Cat Stevens

God, How I hated the 70's: Get Carter 1971.

God, How I hated the 70's: Get Carter 1971.

God, How I hated the 70's: It was really just an awful and shameful time when...

God, How I hated the 70's: It was really just an awful and shameful time when...

God, How I hated the 70's: I think he was a decent guy but he was in way over...

God, How I hated the 70's: I think he was a decent guy but he was in way over...

Jane Asher and Jane Fonda





Dance



Gilligan!


Cool car !


Slip and slide! The lawsuit in a box waiting to happen


Poolside



Music of the Sixties Forever: Lulu, a great talent who has lasted the test of ti...

Music of the Sixties Forever: Lulu, a great talent who has lasted the test of ti...

July 11th 1960: To Kill a Mockingbird published



On this day in 1960, the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee was published by J.B Lippincott & Co. The novel tells the story of the trial of a young African-American man in Alabama in the 1930s, and is told from the perspective of the daughter of the defendant’s lawyer, Scout Finch. Lee was partly inspired by events she recalled from her own childhood growing up in Alabama in the days of Jim Crow segregation. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was released during a turbulent time for American race relations, as the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement was beginning to get underway with sit-ins and Freedom Rides in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education (1954). 



The novel was originally going to be called ‘Atticus’ for Scout’s father and the moral centre of the story, but was renamed for one of Atticus’s iconic lines. The novel was an immediate success, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. In 1962 it was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Gregory Peck and featuring the film debut of Robert Duvall as the elusive Boo Radley. Harper Lee never published another novel and remains reclusive from the press, though she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007. The influence of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ has never faded in the 54 years since its release, and is a favourite of many for its warmth and humour while tackling some of the most troubling issues of its day.
"Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird"


...the little bastard!